My Git Aliases And Abbreviations

As a developer, Git is one of the essential tools in my daily work. Today I want to share my git aliases and fish abbreviations that make working with Git more comfortable. In my ~/.gitconfig file: [alias] # Git Commit, and Push — in one step. cmp = "!f() { git commit -m \"$@\"; }; f" # NEW. new = "!f() { git cmp \"📦 NEW: $@\"; }; f" # IMPROVE.
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The Terminal Sparks Joy

The Terminal Sparks Joy
Today I realized that using tools like the terminal, Vim or Tmux “spark joy” for me. The term comes from Marie Kondo’s bestselling book about tidying up. It loosely translates from original Japanese to ”the feeling of excitement and pleasure”. I thoroughly enjoy using Unix and its tools. For me, it’s like a mini game where I can always learn something new and feel more productive. For example, you can be productive with Vim after a few days.
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TIL: How to Watch YouTube Videos With mpv and Keyboard Shortcuts

Distraction-free YouTube (and other videos) on your computer The free YouTube version has ads and suggestions what to watch. Those try to keep the user on YouTube’s website. Tons of useful videos exist. If you’re like me, you’ll soon fall into the rabbit hole and spend too much time on YouTube. Today I learned how to use a distraction-free method of watching YouTube with mpv and (optionally) Vimium.
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TIL: How to Replace Backslashes (grep, sed, ripgrep, sd, ruplacer)

Today I needed to remove backslashes from a number of files. I have yaml frontmatter that should look like this: tags: - React.js - JavaScript I had some files that had backslashes before the dash: tags: \- React.js \- JavaScript You can use Unix tools like grep or sed to search all files that match a pattern. Then you can replace that pattern. But you have to remember that a backslash is a special character.
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Friday Picks 079

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Friday Picks 076

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Friday Picks 072

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TIL About Adding a New Line to “git commit -m”

For Git messages I use git commit -m to add a headline to a git commit. So far, I’ve never used the detailed summary which you can add to a commit message. It was tooMuch of a hassle to open a text editor and add a detailed explanation. Today I learned that you can write a multi-line commit message with git commit -m. For example, in Bash: git commit -m 'my headline Here goes the detailed explanation of the commit ' Source:
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TIL How to Execute an External Command in Vim and Reload the File

Or: How To Pipe The Current Vim Buffer Through Unix Commands In this post I will show you how to run a shell command from within Vim, and immediately reload that file. The Problem I write a Go file in (Neo)Vim. I want to use the command gofmt to format my file. Running gofmt will change the contents of my file, so I’ll need to reload my Vim buffer.
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broot - the better ls

It’s become popular to rewrite classic command-line tools in Rust: Shell is the essential tool for every programmer. The more familiar you become with the available tools, the more efficient you can be with using your computer. Many Rust alternatives provide a modern, faster, and more user-friendly alternative. One of them is broot. What Is broot? broot is a combination of ls (for listing directory contents) and tree (for listing contents in a tree-like format).
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